Experimental Geographies

"There is tenderness only in the coarsest demand: that no-one shall go hungry any more" – Theodor Adorno, Minima Moralia (1974: 156)

Negri Letter: “Lettera ad un amico tunisino”/ “Letter to a Tunisian Friend”

Things have been moving so quickly in North Africa that the uprising in Tunisia already seems a long time ago. Here’s a letter by Negri that may be of interest. It was first published in Italian here, than translated into French, and finally into English.

Some passages that stuck out:

“It is no longer possible to imagine a democratic regime which is not bound by information, communication, and the construction of public opinion with respect to the truth, or to liberty, or the filtering of the multitude [au filtre de la multitude]. The extreme importance online initiatives have had during the insurrection would have to be safeguarded as a practice of permanent possibility.”

And:

“The plurality of information should not represent the means of its own capitalization, but ought to be guaranteed by popular sovereignty so as to increase discussion, the clash of opinions and decisions. The right to free speech shouldn’t just be an individual right, but is meant to be a collective practice, excluding all capitalist pretensions to suspend this right and all attempts to subjugate it. The right to free speech should be affirmed as a constituent power [potenza constituente] open to the legitimation of the common.”

And finally:

“[…]the problem is […] how to transform the banks into a public service, and to do it in such a way that the allotment of financial funds and the development of investment policy is decided in common. The tools of finance should be put into service of the multitude.”

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This entry was posted on February 22, 2011 by in Commons, Politics and tagged , .
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